Editing

GEN

Catfished by Jacob Wohl: How a Texas oil heiress got scammed — and then seduced — by Twitter’s most inept Trump-loving troll. (Feature by Lexi Pandell)

American Ballplayers Are Flooding the Mexican League: A recent rule change allows American-born players to go pro in Mexico—and they’re fielding a familiar backlash. (Feature by Joseph Bien-Kahn)

Is It Possible to Cure the Desire for Revenge? One researcher is trying to end gun violence by flipping the script on vengeance killings (Feature by Erin Schumaker)

The Trump 45: Meet 45 people whose lives changed, for better or worse — mostly for worse — since Donald Trump became President of the United States. (Feature package)

How the Government Is Blocking Humanitarian Aid on the Border: An upcoming criminal trial is just the latest effort by Fish and Wildlife Service and Border Patrol agents to prosecute volunteers who are trying to keep people from dying in the desert. (Reported dispatch by Arvind Dilawar)

Julián Castro Opens Up About His Failure to Launch: The Dems’ most progressive candidate spoke to GEN about his struggling campaign. (Feature by David Perry)

Inside the Democratic Party’s Struggle to Rein in Trump: With the August recess fast approaching, Democrats remain divided over whether to fight fire with fire. (Reported dispatch by Matt Laslo)

A Memo to Our Democratic Presidential Candidates: Don’t make Detroit’s debates a repeat of Miami (Op-ed by Rahm Emanuel)

Corey Lewandowski Just Made the Democrats Look Utterly Bloodless: The former Trump campaign aide’s hearing was a political test, and the House Democrats failed it. (Op-ed by Rick Wilson)

The Media Gaslighting of 2020’s Most Likable Candidate: Elizabeth Warren has proven over and over that she’s a charismatic figure. Why do we keep casting her as a nagging schoolmarm? (Op-ed by Sady Doyle)

Anti-Abortion Lawmakers Have No Idea How Women’s Bodies Work: We cannot ask women to follow laws written by men who believe our bodies work like a game of ‘Marble Run.’ (Op-ed by Jessica Valenti)


Pacific Standard

Inside Ryan Zinke’s Department of Industry Influence: New documents reveal just how much the Department of the Interior favored industry over conservation. (Feature by Jimmy Tobias)

Inside North America’s Only Legal Safe Injection Facility: Cities across the United States are considering opening supervised injection facilities, where addicts can shoot up under the watchful eye of nurses. (Feature by Francie Diep)

Letters to Prison: In 1989 in Fairbanks, Alaska, Byran Perotti killed Johnny Jackson in cold blood. The community’s silence around the murder compounded the shock of the crime itself. (Feature by Elisabeth Fairfield Stokes)

Kevin de León Took on the Democratic Establishment. It Fought Back: The state senator from Los Angeles has racked up major legislative achievements on everything from clean energy to immigration reform. Now he faces his biggest—and most unlikely—challenge yet: unseating Dianne Feinstein. (Feature by Jack Herrera)

How Ken Layne Created a Publishing Oasis in a Desert Town of 8,000 People: Layne’s quarterly magazine, Desert Oracle, tries to give readers a sense of the profound solitude—and weirdness—of the Mojave Desert. (Feature by Max Genecov)

The Shocking Legacy of America’s Worst Modern-Day Lynching: Twenty years after the brutal, racially motivated murder of James Byrd Jr. in Jasper, Texas, some residents are trying to scrub the crime—and the bigotry behind it—from the town’s history. (Feature by John Savage)

Cruising Through the End of the World: What does an evolving tourism industry mean for the people of the Northwest Passage? (Feature by Eva Holland)

California’s Looming Water Pollution Problem: In California’s Central Valley, the oil industry has been dumping wastewater into unlined—and under-regulated—ponds, threatening the state’s limited groundwater and the humans who rely on it. (Feature by Kate Wheeling)

Hailu Mergia’s Great Re-Appearing Act: Hailu Mergia, once among the most beloved musicians in Ethiopia, spent the past two decades working as a cab driver in Washington, D.C. But he never stopped playing, and he’s back at it again with a new album. (Feature by Jack Denton)